My Cat Has Not Peed in 2 Days (10 Reasons Why)

Peeing is a natural process for cats, and it is important that they do so regularly to maintain their health. Cats typically pee around four times a day. However, if they aren’t peeing or haven’t peed for two days or longer, you may get worried and wonder, “My cat has not peed in 2 days” what should I do? Well, this article will explain 10 different reasons why your cat is not peeing for multiple days and some possible solutions.

My Cat Has Not Peed in 2 Days – What Are The Causes?

If your cat has not peed in two or three days, there is sometimes to be a matter of concern. There are several possible reasons why your cat may not be peeing, and it is important to identify the cause so that you can take appropriate action.

Here are 10 possible reasons why your cat may not be peeing:

1. Dehydration

Dehydration is a common cause of cats not peeing. If your cat is not drinking enough water, it may become dehydrated, which can lead to a number of health problems, including urinary tract infections.

Make sure your cat has plenty of freshwaters to drink and try increasing their water intake by adding some wet food to their diet. Dehydration makes your cat unable to produce urine, so getting them to drink more water should help to get them peeing again.

The longer your cat stays dehydrated, the more serious the health problems will become. Defecation also needs water to be excreted so if your cat isn’t drinking enough water they will become constipated as well.

2. Urinary Tract Infection

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is another common cause of cats not peeing. A UTI is a bacterial infection that affects the urinary system, and it can cause inflammation and pain when your cat tries to pee.

If your cat has a UTI, it will likely be urinating less than usual and may also have a fever. If you think your cat may have a UTI, take them to the vet for treatment. When your cat is in pain, they may be reluctant to pee, so getting them the help they need is crucial.

With proper treatment, most UTIs can be cured within a few days.

3. Bladder Stones

Bladder stones are another possible cause of cats not peeing. These stones can form in the bladder due to a variety of factors, including dehydration, poor diet, and infection. If your cat has bladder stones, they will likely be urinating very little and may also have blood in their urine.

If you think your cat may have bladder stones, take them to the vet for treatment. Bladder stones can be surgically removed, but if they are left untreated, they can cause serious health problems.

4. Diabetes

If your cat has diabetes, it may not be peeing as often as it should. This is because high blood sugar levels can cause the kidneys to stop working properly, which leads to a build-up of urine in the bladder.

If you think your cat may have diabetes, take them to the vet for a blood test. With proper treatment, most cases of diabetes can be successfully managed. Diabetes means that your cat will need to be monitored closely and will likely require lifelong treatment.

5. Kidney Failure

Kidney failure is another serious health problem that can cause cats not to pee. When the kidneys fail, they can no longer filter toxins from the blood, which can lead to a build-up of urine in the bladder.

If you think your cat may have kidney failure, take them to the vet for a blood test. With proper treatment, most cases of kidney failure can be successfully managed. However, cats with kidney failure will likely require lifelong treatment.

6. Cancers of the Urinary Tract

Cancers of the urinary tract are another possible cause of cats not peeing. These cancers can affect any part of the urinary tract, including the bladder, urethra, and kidneys.

If your cat has cancer of the urinary tract, they will likely be urinating less than usual and may also have blood in their urine. If you think your cat may have cancer of the urinary tract, take them to the vet for a diagnosis.

With proper treatment, most cases of urinary tract cancer can be cured.

7. Constipation

Constipation is another possible cause of cats not peeing. When your cat is constipated, it will be unable to poop because the stool has become hard and dry. This can lead to a build-up of feces in the intestines, which can cause nausea and vomiting.

If you think your cat may be constipated, take them to the vet for treatment. With proper treatment, most cases of constipation can be cured within a few days.

8. Stress

Stress can also cause cats not to pee. This is because stress can cause the muscles in the bladder to contract, which can make it difficult for your cat to pee.

If you think your cat may be stressed, take a look at their environment and see if there is anything that could be causing them anxiety. You may need to make some changes to help your cat feel more comfortable. With proper treatment, most cases of stress can be cured.

9. Anxiety

Anxiety can also cause cats not to pee. This is because anxiety can cause the muscles in the bladder to contract, which can make it difficult for your cat to pee. If you think your cat may be anxious, take a look at their environment and see if there is anything that could be causing them anxiety.

You may need to make some changes to help your cat feel more comfortable. With proper treatment, most cases of anxiety can be cured.

10. Old Age

Old age is a possible cause of cats not peeing. As cats get older, their kidneys and bladder may start to malfunction, which can lead to a build-up of urine in the bladder.

If you think your cat may be old, take them to the vet for a check-up. With proper treatment, most cases of old age can be successfully managed.

While there are many possible causes of cats not peeing, the most common ones are constipation, diabetes, kidney failure, and stress.
If you think your cat may be having trouble peeing, take them to the vet for a diagnosis. With proper treatment, most cases of these health problems can be successfully managed.

Summary

Let’s face it, cats are a hassle to keep clean. If you see that your cat has not peed in days, take a look outside of their litter box. The problem could be that your cat has found a new place to pee, or because a friend has stopped by and relieved themselves all over the place.

If you notice your cat is not using their litter box, or is using it less frequently than usual, you should take them to see a vet immediately. They will likely prescribe something for their stomach and/or give them a stronger form of food until their body adjusts.

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